Before I Die…

Last week the WSJ printed a great column: one man’s list of “things most essential to a fully satisfactory and happy life.”

Here are the 5:

1. Before I die I want to know that I have done something truly great, that I have accomplished some glorious achievement the credit for which belongs solely to me.

2. Before I die I want to know that during my life I have brought great happiness to others.

3. Before I die I want to have visited a large portion of the globe and to have actually lived with several foreign races in their own environment.

4. Before I die there is another great desire I must fulfill, and that is to have felt a truly great love.

5. Before I die I want to feel a great sorrow.

This last is the most interesting.  Here’s the author’s explanation, in full:

Before I die I want to feel a great sorrow. This, perhaps, of all my wishes will seem the strangest to the reader. Yet, is it unusual that I should wish to have had a complete life? I want to have lived fully, and certainly sorrow is a part of life. It is my belief that, as in the case of love, no man has lived until he has felt sorrow. It molds us and teaches us that there is a far deeper significance to life than might be supposed if one passed through this world forever happy and carefree. Moreover, once the pangs of sorrow have slackened, for I do not believe it to be a permanent emotion, its dregs often leave us a better knowledge of this world of ours and a better understanding of humanity. Yes, strange as it may seem, I really want to feel a great sorrow.

In full it’s a beautiful piece; the last paragraph particularly lovely:

As for death itself, I do not believe that it will be such a disagreeable thing providing my life has been successful. I have always considered life and death as two cups of wine. Of the first cup, containing the wine of life, we can learn a little from literature and from those who have drunk it, but only a little. In order to get the full flavor we must drink deeply of it for ourselves. I believe that after I have quaffed the cup containing the wine of life, emptied it to its last dregs, then I will not fear to turn to that other cup, the one whose contents can be designated only by X, an unknown, and a thing about which we can gain no knowledge at all until we drink for ourselves. Will it be sweet, or sour, or tasteless? Who can tell? Surely none of us like to think of death as the end of everything. Yet is it? That is a question that for all of us will one day be answered when we, having witnessed the drama of life, come to the final curtain. Probably we will all regret to leave this world, yet I believe that after I have drained the first cup, and have possibly grown a bit weary of its flavor, I will then turn not unwillingly to the second cup and to the new and thrilling experience of exploring the unknown.

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