Training

This is the year I’ll check my “marathon before 30” off my bucket list, with the Marine Corps Marathon at Halloween.

Here’s the (rough) schedule I plan to use, from the immensely helpful Runners’ World:

Beginner Plan

Week M T W T F S S Total
1* Rest 4 miles, including 4:00 TUT Rest 1-hour run Rest 4 miles 6 miles 15-16 miles
2 Rest 4 miles, including 4:00 TUT Rest 1-hour run Rest 4 miles 7 miles 15-16 miles
3 Rest 4 miles, including 5:00 TUT Rest 6 miles Rest Rest 8 miles 18-19 miles
4 Rest 4 miles, including 5:00 TUT Rest 6 miles Rest Rest 9 miles 18-19 miles
5 Rest 4 miles, including 3×2:00 AI Rest 4 miles Rest 5-K race 6-8 miles 19-21 miles
6 Rest 5 miles, including 6:00 TUT Rest 7 miles Rest Rest 10 miles 22-24 miles
7 Rest 5 miles, including 6:00 TUT Rest 7 miles Rest Rest 12 miles 22-24 miles
8 Rest 5 miles, including 7:00 TUT Rest 8 miles Rest Rest 12 miles 25-27 miles
9 Rest 5 miles, including 7:00UTUT Rest 8 miles Rest Rest 14miles 25-27 miles
10 Rest 5 miles, including 3×3:00 AI Rest 4 miles Rest 10-K race 5 miles 24 miles
11 Rest 5 miles, including 8:00 TUT Rest 9 miles Rest Rest 16 miles 30-32 miles
12 Rest 5 miles, including 8:00 TUT Rest 9 miles Rest Rest 18 miles 30-32 miles
13 Rest 5 miles, including 9:00 TUT Rest 10 miles Rest 4 miles 20 miles 39 miles
14 Rest 5 miles, including 9:00 TUT Rest 10 miles Rest 4 miles 10 miles 29 miles
15 Rest 3 miles, including 3X3:00 AI Rest 5 miles Rest 3 miles, including 3×2:00 AI 5 miles 16 miles
16 Rest 3 miles, Including 3×2:00 AI Rest 3-mile jog Rest 2-mile jog Marathon

 

Definitions

Aerobic Intervals (AI): Timed repetitions (of 2:00 to 3:00 minutes) slightly faster than your normal training pace–enough to make you breathe harder, but still not go anaerobic (panting, gasping, verge-of-out-of-breath). Jog slowly after each repetition until you are refreshed enough to run the next.

Total Uphill Time (TUT): The total number of minutes you spend running semivigorously up inclines–could be repeats up the same hill or total uphill time over a hilly loop.

Easy Runs: mean totally comfortable and controlled. If you’re running with someone else, you should be able to converse easily. You’ll likely feel as if you could go faster. Don’t. Here’s some incentive to take it easy: You’ll still burn about 100 calories for every mile that you run.

Long Runs: are any steady run at or longer than race distance designed to enhance endurance, which enables you to run longer and longer and feel strong doing it. A great long-run tip: Find a weekly training partner for this one. You’ll have time to talk about anything that comes up.

Speedwork: means bursts of running shorter than race distance, some at your race goal pace, some faster. This improves cardiac strength, biomechanical efficiency, running economy, and the psychological toughness that racing demands.

Race Day Rules: Run slower than you feel like you should be running over the first 12-13 miles. Look around, chat a bit with those around you. And walk through the aid stations, drink fluids, take a little break, then slowly resume your running.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s